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Wild Violet Short Bread Cookies

Here in Southwestern Ontario, generally in the month of May after the April rain had subsided and we have had a "few" ( and I use the word few lightly being in Ontario lol ) days of warmth, we start to see the first of springs blossoms, and among those are wild violets!




Wild violets (Viola Sororia) are a perennial and native to Eastern North America, and generally inhabits wetland areas, moist woods, and shade. They definitely spread on lawns and gardens and are typically considered a weed by some, which is not the case!


These beautiful 5 petal flowers are edible and medicinal and fill my front yard each spring. Before my husband comes along on the tractor and mows them all down with the first cut of the season, I take advantage and forage some of these pretty blooms to make wild violet short bread cookies! Picking them is fun! This year I took my infant son out with me and we rooted around on the front yard choosing the nicest, biggest ones we could find!

Wild violets and forget-me-not edible flowers
Wild Violets and Forget-me-nots

Just a tip when foraging dainty blooms like violets: it is best to go out in the morning when it's still a little cool. If you get any heat in the afternoon the plants could start to wilt a little before you get your cookies made! Also, please remember to pick your blooms from an area that you know is clean , free from chemicals and where no dogs may have been.




Wild violet short bread cookies:


Ingredients:

  • 1 cup of butter (room temperature, not melted)

  • 1/2 cup of granulated sugar (you could use icing sugar or brown sugar instead if you choose)

  • 1 tsp of vanilla extract

  • approximately 30 violet blooms


Lets Prep:


Once you have a sufficient amount of flowers gathered ( I usually grab a few more than what I think ill need). You can throw them in a container in the fridge too keep them from wilting if you don’t plan to bake your cookies right away.


When you are ready to make your cookies preheat your oven to 325F. Remove your flowers from the fridge and remove any stem. Pick out the nicest ones laying them evenly on one half of a piece of parchment paper, and then fold the other half over top and set something heavy on them ( I used my flour bin!) This is just going to help flatten them out a bit beforehand!


Lets Bake:


In a mixing bowl add your butter and sugar and start to cream them together. (I used my electric hand mixer for this as it does need to be combined quite well. I used a moderately high speed until well blended until fluffy and pale yellow).


Next, add the flour and vanilla and combine. Knead into a well blended dough. Cover the bowl and place in your refrigerator for 20 minutes.


Lightly flour your work surface and roll out your dough to about 1/4 inch thickness. I just used a canning ring but you can use whichever cookie cutter shape you like! Cut out your desired sizes.


Next, place your pre flattened blooms onto your cut outs and arrange to your liking! Then, take your rolling pin and LIGHTLY press the flowers into the cookie tops. You do not want to press so hard as to flatten out your dough, but just enough pressure to implant the violet blooms.



Place on a baking sheet and bake for 7-8 minutes.


Let cool and Enjoy!


These beautiful, simple cookies are perfect for a tea time treat, weddings or showers! You can use this same technique with other edible flowers as well including pansy, pea flowers, kale flowers, chamomile etc. Just do your research beforehand!





Also try:


  • You can use a food processor and lightly chop some of your violet blossoms to mix right into your dough for a nice speckled effect!


  • Try adding some course sugar on your cookie tops before baking for a pretty (and delicious) sparkle!


Do you have Wild Violets where you live? Comment if you foraged them and what you made! Did you make this recipe? Let me know how it turned out or if you have any questions!




















































































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